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Nur Ihsan Samsuddin

Abstract

Language is one of the elements of culture that reflects the characteristics of every nation and ethnic group in this world. Mastering a language means mastering the world. An important aspect of language is politeness so that communication can run well, effectively and efficiently to achieve goals. This study aims to determine politeness in language as a reflection of Tolaki-Mekongga culture in the Kolaka Regency Junior High School environment. The method used is descriptive method in the form of qualitative research. The results of the study show that politeness in language as a reflection of Tolaki-Mekongga culture in the junior secondary education environment of Kolaka Regency is largely determined by context, social status between speakers and interlocutors and culture. Politeness in language as a mirror of culture is largely determined by forms of speech that use fragments of cultural elements, such as mo, ki, -ko, ji-mbe. There are utterances that contain fragments of Tolaki-Mekongga cultural elements that distinguish a high politeness rating, some that show a low politeness rating, and some that show a neutral politeness rating. Speeches that contain fragments of Tolaki-Mekongga cultural elements which are considered to have a high politeness rating are –-ki. This form is always distinguished by –ko. This form is understood to have a low politeness rating. While the fragments of cultural elements that are considered neutral are ji, -ka, -mbe, -i, tawwa and -ta. These forms do not differentiate between gender, social status, and age. This form is used by all groups within the scope of the Tolaki-Mekongga community in the secondary education environment of Kolaka Regency.

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How to Cite

Language Politeness as A Mirror of Rejection-Free Culture In First Secondary Education Kolaka District. (2023). Journal of Namibian Studies : History Politics Culture, 33, 1188–1200. https://doi.org/10.59670/jns.v33i.559

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